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What Matters March: MedTech News You Need to Know

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March 07, 2018

Overheard at GMM HQ

"They can find the steak on Google, but if you want them to smell the sizzle you have to get cooking." - Lauren Kirmil, on Marketing to the Digitally Empowered Patient for Medical Device Companies.


WHAT THE INDUSTRY IS BUZZING ABOUT

STROKE OF (ARTIFICIAL) INTELLIGENCE

The FDA recently approved the use of Viz.AI's artificial intelligence software to help quickly identify whether a patient has suffered a stroke. The software uses a form of AI to analyze computed tomography images of the brain to find indicators like large vessel blockages which are associated with a stroke. 

THEN WHAT?

If stroke indicators are detected, notifications are sent to specialists who can view the patient's CT images on a mobile device, usually within six minutes of the initial detection. Customer service suggestion: If the notification takes longer than 10 minutes, the patient gets a free pizza.

THE 411

Stroke is a leading cause of permanent disability, death and healthcare costs globally. Early identification and intervention by a specialist are critical steps in mitigating long-term damage and preventing catastrophic outcomes, and this new AI software poses a novel approach to increased responsiveness. Could it also be a tell-tale sign that the FDA is finally warming to AI? Only time will tell...

TWEET THIS STORY


NEW AND IMPROVED DELIVERY

No, not another new service from Amazon. Rani Therapeutics has developed an oral capsule that protects a drug therapy until it is ready to be delivered across the intestinal wall into the bloodstream, potentially allowing intravenous drugs to be delivered orally. More convenient and less daunting, like Postmates for your meds. Needle-phobes rejoice!

BUT LIKE, HOW?

The Ranipill has small needles that inject the drugs into the intestinal wall once ingested, after which the needles dissolve naturally. Just don't think about it.

THE 411

The Ranipill is a combination of device and drug that is approaching the clinical trial phase with $142M in backing and the potential to change the paradigm of drug delivery forever. Stay tuned.

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BECAUSE OF COURSE YOUR IPHONE KNOWS YOUR MEDICAL HISTORY

Apple's latest iOS features an updated health records section within the health app, designed to bring together hospitals, clinics, and the existing health app to allow users to see their medical data from multiple providers. You think the sponsored ads on your social media feeds are eerily personal now? Just. You. Wait.

JUST ANOTHER DISTRACTING APP?

The app is intended to be a consumer-friendly approach to creating health records based on fhir (fast healthcare interoperability resources), a standard for transferring electronic medical records. At least 12 institutions have already agreed to make the feature available to their patients, including Johns Hopkins. Seems like it might be more useful than Candy Crush.

THE 411

The updated app allows iPhone users to view medical information from multiple providers in one view, covering allergies, conditions, immunizations, lab results, medications, procedures, and vitals. Apple owns you, by the way.

TWEET THIS STORY

GOOD TO KNOW

Just in time for St. Patrick's Day: There's a new drug that can reverse the damaging impacts of heavy alcohol consumption on regeneration of brain cells.



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