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What Matters: October's MedTech News You Need to Know

Overheard at GMM HQ

"From now until Thanksgiving, every latté shall be Pumpkin Spice." – Valerie Barro discusses the importance of sticking to your core values in our latest blog.

WHAT THE INDUSTRY IS BUZZING ABOUT

TAKE TWO HOURS AND CALL ME IN THE MORNING

A recent study conducted by the American Medical Board found that for every one hour doctors spend with patients, they spend an additional two hours slogging through electronic medical records (EMR). Turns out not even your doctor can prevent too much screen time.

SWITCH TO POWER SAVE MODE?

Study authors noted that "meaningful interactions with patients... are powerful drivers of physician career satisfaction," and with reports of physician burnout on the rise, it appears that EMR just might be the mistress that's getting in the way of happy doctor/patient relationships.

THE 411

One author recommends documentation support such as dictation or documentation assistant services to help cut down on EMR hours, while a physician complains that since implementing EMR, "the emphasis is really on data collection." Prognosis? Doctors need a cure for their ailing system.

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FIRST YOU VIEW THE BONE...

Researchers at Trinity College Dublin are producing high-resolution 3-D bone images using nanoagents that attach to every calciferous nook and cranny, providing a complete 3-D image of a damaged area. X-rays are so last year.

...AND THEN YOU PRINT IT, YOU PRINT IT.

Up next? Bioprinting. Researchers are now engineering cartilage templates by depositing different biomaterials and adult stem cells to match the shape of a segment within the spine. These cartilage templates mature over time into a fully functional bone organ with its own blood vessels.

THE 411

This is just the beginning, and as the implementation of bioprinted implantable tissues becomes increasingly possible, a team at Harvard is on the brink of developing 4-D printing, creating materials that transform and assemble themselves. Don't worry, you'll still get a sticker and a lollipop for good behavior.

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BEAM ME UP, SCOTTY

NZ Technologies has developed an "interactive holographic device" called Tipso – or "touchless interaction with PACs in sterile operation" that allows surgeons to view virtual images (think CT scan) projected directly onto their patients' surgical drape. Basically turning your next surgery into a scene from the Matrix.

A [HOLOGRAPHIC] PICTURE IS WORTH 1000 WORDS 

Not exactly, but it is worth a reported 15% reduction in surgery time. Viewing patient images without having to scrub-out, go to a radiology room, and then scrub back in saves surgeons time and potential distractions.

THE 411

Mostly we'd like to point out that the head of thoracic surgery at Surrey Memorial Hospital, where the device has been implemented, is named James Bond. According to Bond (James Bond), Tipso allows surgeons to coordinate "operations with imaging while staying at the bed." Typical Bond.

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GOOD TO KNOW

While there is plenty to learn from the Theranos implosion, one thing to keep in mind is that anyone who insists on wearing a turtleneck and a puffy vest year-round in California might have something to hide. Just sayin'.



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